literarysins:

In light of the 50 Shades of Grey trailer coming out today, quick reminder that that book is about an abusive and controlling relationship, not BDSM.

Fanfiction (published or not) is important for women of all ages to explore gender roles and sexuality in a way that is less stigmatized and more accessible. 

But do not do the BDSM community a disservice by calling the relationship described in the book a standard BDSM experience. 

thisisnotjapan:

-By Sharon H. Chang

When I wrote my first post for Hyphen, Talking Mixed-Race Identity with Young Children, I was deliberately blunt about race. I wrote about how I don’t tell my multiracial son, who presents as a racial minority, that he’s white — but I do tell him he’s Asian. While the essay resonated with many people, others made comments like this: 

“Your child is as white as he is Asian… Why embrace one label and not the other?”

“Why is he Asian but not white? He has white ancestors as much as Asian ones. So if it’s OK to call him Asian, it’s OK to call him white. Or, if it’s not OK to call him white (because he’s not completely white) then it’s not OK to call him Asian, because he’s not completely Asian either.”

“Your child is neither white nor Asian. I once heard this description: When you have a glass of milk and add chocolate to it, you no longer have just a glass of milk and you no longer just have chocolate because you have created something completely different. A bi-racial or multi-racial child is not either/or.”

In the 1990s, psychologist and mixed-race scholar Maria P.P. Root wrote the famous Bill of Rights for People of Mixed Heritage, stirred by her examination of mixed-race identity, interviews with hundreds of multiracial folk across the U.S., and the struggles multiracial people face in forming and claiming a positive sense of self. “I have the right not to justify my existence to the world,” it reads. “To identify myself differently than strangers expect me to identify. To create a vocabulary about being multiracial or multiethnic.”

Almost two decades later, these proclamations still ring so true. Some people are completely unwilling to honor my family’s choice to identify as mixed-race and Asian because it doesn’t align with their own ideas about how we should identify. The right of a mixed-race person to self-construct and self-define, even today, endures continual policing from people with their own agendas.

If it’s not OK to call him white…then it’s not OK to call him Asian”; “Your child is neither white nor Asian.” These critiques are so often centered on whiteness: a sense of disbelief that I would “deny” it to my son, and the conviction that, if I won’t teach him he is white too — or at least partly white — then he is nothing at all. Even the problematic chocolate milk analogy — which the commenter clearly thought was progressive — begins with a glass of white milk with “color” added. White is seen as normative, and there is a total failure to recognize that racial categories are political

Of course I talk to my son about our white family members who are a part of his life and his identity. But those stories are about growing up in Virginia, or window candles at Christmastime in New England, or his Slovakian great-great-grandmother who came through Ellis Island alone when she was sixteen. Those stories are about our history, not about being “white.” “White” is not an ethnic celebration, a food festival, or a heritage parade. It’s about having unearned power and privilege based on the way you look.

In Dr. Peggy McIntosh’s famous essay on white privilege, she listed a series of unearned privileges white people enjoy. Among them: “I can if I wish arrange to be in the company of people of my race most of the time”; “I can turn on the television or open to the front page of the paper and see people of my race widely represented”; “I can speak in public to a powerful male group without putting my race on trial”; and “I can be pretty sure that if I ask to talk to the ‘person in charge,’ I will be facing a person of my race.” Are any of these true of my multiracial Asian son? My son, who barely has any children’s books that reflect his racial image, who is constantly scanned and assessed aloud based on “how Asian” he looks, my son who has had many more white teachers than teachers of color? 

Telling my child he’s white also won’t help him understand why children who were less than one-quarter Japanese were interned during World War II; why a stranger would look at him and say there are no “pure races” anymore; why a leading theatre company in our city unabashedly staged a yellowface production of an operetta; why kids on the playground pull back their eyes in a slant and spit out one of those ridiculous anti-Asian chants that just won’t go away. When I tell my son that he is Asian, mixed-race, multiracial, and a person of color, I’m not denying him parts of his ancestral-ethnic heritage. I’m teaching him about the race politics that intrude upon our lives whether we want them to or not. I’m preparing him to exist in a world that obstinately persists in being racially divided. And I’m trying to let him know something about the ways he has and will continue to be judged throughout his life, not because he’s white — but because he’s mixed with color.

donovan-drago:

Tumblr, brace yourself for a day or 10…

gettibucket:

mmymoon:

gothiccharmschool:

dbvictoria:

Meet the Man Who Transforms Corpses into Diamonds

Rinaldo Willy’s job is to transform dead people into precious stones. 

Willy, 33, is the founder and CEO of Algordanza, a peculiar funeral home based in the lovely town of Domat/Ems in western Switzerland. Algordanza—which in the local Romansch language means “remembrance”—is one of the leaders in the production of so called “memorial diamonds.” If you fancy a blinged-out eternal sleep, Algordanza will put the latest technologies at your service to convert your ashes into a synthetic diamond. 

The price for this transfiguration ranges between 4,500 and 20,000 Swiss francs ($5,000-$22,000), depending on how big a diamond you want to become. That includes the packaging of your shiny remains into what the firm’s website describes as a “noble wooden box.” But it will then be up to your loved ones to decide whether to leave you in your noble box or put you on a ring or pendant so they can carry you around with them. 

Every year, 850 former-people enter Algordanza’s laboratory to emerge some years later as a precious gem. While shortage of land and increasing population are calling the traditional cemetery model into question, perhaps the future of corpse management could lie in this unusual blend of mortuary science and jewelry. 

To further investigate, I caught up with the man himself, Rinaldo Willy.

So, can you tell us how you got the idea of making diamonds from corpses?

The idea first struck meten years ago, when I was a student of economics. One of my teachers gave me an article by a Russian scientist to read; it was about the production of synthetic diamonds to be used in the semiconductor industry. The article explained how such diamonds could be made from ashes, and I misinterpreted it, thinking it was referring to human ashes–while in fact it was talking about vegetable ashes. 

I liked the idea, and I asked my teacher for more information on that process of transforming human ashes into diamonds. He quickly told me that I had got the whole thing wrong. But he found that my mistake was quite intriguing, so he got in touch with the author of the article, who just happened to have some diamond-making machines here in Switzerland. Together, we started to set up what would become Algordanza.

What was so compelling about turning human ashes into diamonds?

Diamonds are precious, pure, clean. They couldn’t be more different from today’s cemeteries, which are places crammed with too many graves, very often neglected, and where you can’t have a real relationship with the dead. I loved the idea of dead people becoming something you can touch and enjoy the sight of. I also like the fact that a diamond remains, can be kept and passed down from generation to generation. It’s not something that you just scatter away at some point, like sometimes happens with ashes from cremation. 

In other words, you think that “diamonds are forever.” 

I don’t want to use that term, since “forever” recalls the concept of eternity, which belongs to the Church’s terminology. We prefer the word “unzerbrechlich,” which in German means “indestructible.” Our diamonds are indestructible tools of remembrance, but, at the end of the day, it depends on a person’s loved ones to keep their memory alive. 

Let’s get a bit technical. What is the procedure to transform human ashes into a synthetic diamond?

The whole process takes place here in Switzerland. After a person is cremated, we receive their ashes; according to the legislation of the country the dead person is from, we either receive the ashes in a single urn or in two urns shipped at two different times to avoid the situation where, in case of accident, all the ashes are lost.

We treat the ashes with particular chemical agents to extract all the carbon from them. Next, carbon is heated to high temperatures and converted into graphite. Finally, we place the graphite in a machine that essentially reproduces the conditions that are given in the depths of the Earth, where natural diamonds form over thousands of years: extremely high pressure and temperatures around 1500 degrees Celsius. After some weeks, or months, we obtain the diamond.

How big are the diamonds that you can create in your laboratory?

Usually they are four carats when they are rough and 1 carat after they’ve been cut. There have been diamonds as big as 1.6 or 1.8 carats, but they were exceptional cases. 

Why do some people become bigger diamonds than others?

In general, the dimension of the diamond depends on how long you keep the graphite in the machine: the longer the process, the bigger the diamond. But it also depends on the quality of the ashes. For example, if a person used to wear dentures, or a prosthesis, or they used to take certain medicines, their ashes would be less pure and the quality of the diamond would be inferior. 

Such things can also influence the color of the stone. For example, people who have been treated with chemotherapy usually wind up being diamonds of lighter colors. But we still don’t know what determines the color of the gem: our diamonds are usually blue because of the presence of boron traces in human body, but every person changes into a different and unique diamond, ranging from crystal-clear to almost black. 

What’s the difference between one of your diamonds and a real diamond?

Our diamonds are real diamonds. They have all the physical and chemical properties of diamonds. Obviously, synthetic diamonds are less valuable than natural ones, since they’re man-made. But you can’t tell our diamonds from natural ones with the naked eye. Not even a jeweler could. The only one way to distinguish between them is a chemical screening – a gemologist may help you with that –which will find out that the stone was made artificially. 

So hypothetically, nobody but gemologists could guess that the diamond ring I am wearing is actually, say, my late fiancée? 

There’s no apparent difference. It would most likely look like a natural blue diamond, which costs in the neighborhood of $40,000.

Don’t you think that it may give rise to a new fashion of “body snatching”? I mean thieves, who aren’t usually very knowledgeable about gemological screenings, could take my diamond in the belief that they’re just stealing a precious stone, when in fact they’re snatching my grandpa.  

Natural diamonds always go with a certificate proving their authenticity; therefore it could be difficult for a thief to resell our diamonds. But the possibility of this kind of theft does exist, since more or less 80 percent of our costumers treat their memorial diamonds as jewels, often mounting them on rings. 

And indeed, a similar case has happened some time ago in Germany: police called us after finding one of our diamonds in a thief’s hideout, together with jewels, money and stolen TVs. Luckily, in that case the diamond had a laser inscription—which we provide at an extra cost—and the police could get in touch with us. 

Is it possible to make more than one diamond from the same person, in order to avoid a scenario in which you lose the diamond, thereby losing your dead relative forever?

Yes, it is possible, since just two grams of carbon are sufficient to produce a diamond. In fact, some of our customers, especially in Japan, ask to make many memorial diamonds from the same ashes, one for each member of the family. Theoretically, and depending on the quantity and quality of the ashes, we could churn out up to 50 diamonds for every person; practically, the best we’ve done so far is nine diamonds. 

How big are you in Japan?

We are huge in Japan. It accounts for 25 percent of our sales. I think that it’s mainly for two reasons: in the first place, they have a much stronger cult of ancestors than we have in Europe; they have a very close relationship with their dead. Secondly, it’s a question of numbers: more than 99 percent of Japanese people are cremated after death. That means that there are many more ashes to be transformed into diamonds. 

In general, why do people resorting to your services decide to be transformed into diamonds?

In many cases they don’t decide, since it’s their relatives—usually their mothers or wives—who come to us. The reason given by the relatives is typically that they want to keep the deceased always with them. But there are also people who choose to become diamonds while they are still alive. Often they are people who are aware that they’ll die soon, like for example someone with a terminal illness. 

One of the reasons they give us is economic—they want to avoid the costs of burial in a cemetery. In other cases, they’re people living alone and very far from the place where they were born, who are afraid that nobody would properly care for their grave if they were buried.

Are you going to become a diamond, too?

I don’t know. Hopefully it will be up to my relatives, to my wife and children, to decide whether I will. They’re the ones who will have to choose the best way to cope with the grief and loss.

(x)

If I don’t manage to transform into an immortal Vampire Witch Queen, this is what I want done with my remains. Then I want the resulting gem set into the most ornate gothy-goth pendant possible ("it needs more bats!"), and passed down through the years as an important goth heirloom. 

My mother and I have been planning this since the process first came out, since my whole family is goth… imagine having all of your loved one on a slowly more glittering pendant~ <3

I”m gonna save up £4000 just so my family can do this with me. 

dannyfenton:

i should be asleep but instead

321gravityfalls:

DAY11
Little Dipper ✂ housebuiltbyghosts

"I was awoken by the sound of mockery. Where is it? Show me the object of ridicule!"
"I’m taller than Dipper!"
"By one millimeter!"
"Hey, hey, don’t get… short with your sister."
"Now Grunkle Stan, I hope you don’t think… little of him."

-GSV RMERHRYOV DRAZIW RH DZGXSRMT

hearditbothways:

I started Dating Simulator: Origins recently so I could get through all of them before Inquisition is released 

So far I like it!!

thesylverlining:

what happened in roughly 1870 though

why was there temporary internet

with a few people searching for pokemon?

(Source: neilcicierega)

typette:

swan2swan:

derrierebender:

Part: 1/2

Yoo Jae-myung, animation director of The Legend of Korra, discusses Nickelodeons initial hesitancy to accept Mike and Bryans proposal of the show… and Korra.

“The sequel focuses on the incarnation of the new Avatar, Korra, as she tries to save a city called the Republic City.”

“So, Korra is a young girl , not a boy. Heroes and protagonists are usually men.”

“That actually became a problem.

Nickelodeon was reluctant to produce this animated series at first because the protagonist was a girl.

I guess you could say that Americans are more conservative than Koreans.

The production was suspended just because the protagonist was a girl.

To compare this situation to a movie production, it’s as if the lead actor has already been cast, but the production agency decides to stop the filming because they don’t approve of the actor.”

Part 2: (x)

Full interview: (x)

You know what?

Flip it.

I’m blaming this. This is why we can’t have nice things. This is why we don’t get the episodes. This is why we don’t get commercials or proper advertising or merchandise. This is still prevalent, they’re still bitter about this, and their utter incompetence and ineptitude when it comes to marketing and promotion could not have POSSIBLY been the genuine reasons for this show’s troubles in the ratings, so it must have been because she’s a girl, so you see “we were right”. That’s all.

This viewpoint will continue until I have a better explanation from the studios. I don’t care if the episodes are on their website when I post this message and jump over to the site, my stance will remain the same. I want an explanation. If you’re not going to give me the product I want to invest in, I want an explanation as to why I can’t have it.

GLTAS was doing fantastic and got incredible reviews, but it was outside the demographic they wanted, so they didn’t renew it. Correct me if I’m wrong.

I don’t understand anymore. Why can’t we just have Korra toys, I’ll buy a toy to keep the show going. god damn it

typette:

nerdmeister:

giancarlovolpe:

isaia:

abyssdreams:

Through a magical miracle I was able to acquire the GLTAS Style Guide, which is a binder catalog of images along with a disc for all the files in PSD or AI format. I was hoping it’d have some stuff we hadn’t seen, but I had no idea what a goldmine I’d landed.

Here’s just some highlights of the files in this baby, because I love you all. TAT<3

Hope and Will Lantern REPLENISHED

This looks like it *would* have been used as guide line for all the merchandise.

I’ve never seen this. And I’m associated with this show in some tangential capacity.

you will never have to scour screencaps for ref EVER AGAIN

casualcissexism:

phantomthelabrat:

princestyle
:

They’re selling homestuck shirts at hot topic, brace yourselves a storm is coming kiddos.

image

There’s your proof, that was on my IG dash.

Actually, this is official! This was the shirt that Hot Topic picked to put in their stores after the WeLoveFine contest! No need to be mad!

image

…Except they fucking whitewashed the artists work and you should be even more mad…

LMAO NICE PARTNERSHIP IDEA WHATPUMPKIN, WE ALL KNOW HOW MUCH YOU LOVE YOUR WHITE KIDS!!!!!!

sexhaver:

westindians:

R.I.P. the actual meaning of the word “aesthetics” 

the way this website uses “aesthetics” is 100% in line with the dictionary definition, what’s the weather like up there on your high horse

cherryot:

life hack: when you and another person grab the same chair, challenge them to a xiaolin showdown